are you sure its fat free
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are you sure its fat free











































The food industry bases its figures on the weight of the product and not the calories the product contains.

This is the reason certain foods can be advertised as 97% fat free.

For example, suppose a 10-ounce serving of a food contains 240 calories, and the label states that it contains
9 grams of fat. The food industry then converts 10 ounces
to grams by multiplying each ounce by 29 grams;
hence, the total weight of the product is 290 grams, and if
there are 9 grams of fat, the percentage of fat is
9
290
× 100% = 3.1%
The procedure used by the food industry is misleading. The correct way to calculate the fat content is to multiply the number of grams of fat by 9 to get the calories.
(Each gram of fat is converted to 9 calories.) In this case,
9 × 9 = 81 calories. Next, divide the fat calories by the
total calories and multiply by 100% to get the percentage of calories derived from fat. In this case, the label
stated that a 10-ounce serving contained a total of 240
calories.
81
240
× 100% = 33.75%
Hence, 33.75% of the calories come from fat, not 3%
as suggested.



Gather three of your favorite packaged foods; perhaps one from each: breakfast, lunch and dinner. Use the model explained in the “Are You Sure It’s Fat Free?” to analyze, through the mathematical formula explained, the fat content and protein content from your foods. To analyze the protein content use 4 calories per gram of protein, rather than the 9 calories for grams of fat.

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Apr 16, 2011
Calculate Calories from Fat
by: Staff


Part II


Gather three of your favorite packaged foods; perhaps one from each: breakfast, lunch and dinner.


Svenhard’s Swedish Bakery – Rainsin-etts: Nutritional facts

1 pastry: 57 grams/2 oz
Calories 230
Calories from fat 90
Total Fat: 10 grams
Sat fat: 4.5 grams
Trans fat: 0 grams
Protein: 3 grams


Campbell’s – Cream of Mushroom Soup

½ cup: 120 ml, 4.3 oz, 122 grams
Calories 100
Calories from fat 50
Total Fat: 6 grams
Sat fat: 1.5 grams
Trans fat: 0 grams
Protein: 1 gram

Bumble Bee – Wild Alaska Pink Salmon

¼ cup: 2.2 oz, 63 grams
Calories 90
Calories from fat 45
Total Fat: 5 grams
Sat fat: 1.0 grams
Trans fat: 0 grams
Protein: 12 grams


Use the model explained in the “Are You Sure It’s Fat Free?” to analyze, through the mathematical formula explained the fat content and protein content from your foods.

To analyze the protein content use 4 calories per gram of protein, rather than the 9 calories for grams of fat.


Svenhard’s Swedish Bakery – Rainsin-etts: Calculations

Calories from Fat content: (10 grams of fat)*(9 calories per gram of fat) = 90 calories
% Calories from Fat: [(90 calories)/(230 calories)]*100 = 39.1%
39.1% of the calories come from fat
Calories from Protein content: (3 grams of protein)*(4 calories per gram of protein) = 12 calories
% Calories from Protein: [(12 calories)/(230 calories)]*100 = 5.21%
5.21% of the calories come from protein


Campbell’s – Cream of Mushroom Soup

Calories from Fat content: (6 grams of fat)*(9 calories per gram of fat) = 54 calories
% Calories from Fat: [(54 calories)/(100 calories)]*100 = 54%
54 % of the calories come from fat
Calories from Protein content: (1 gram of protein)*(4 calories per gram of protein) = 4 calories
% Calories from Protein: [(4 calories)/(100 calories)]*100 = 4 %
4 % of the calories come from protein


Bumble Bee – Wild Alaska Pink Salmon

Calories from Fat content: (5 grams of fat)*(9 calories per gram of fat) = 45 calories
% Calories from Fat: [(45 calories)/(90 calories)]*100 = 50%
50 % of the calories come from fat
Calories from Protein content: (12 grams of protein)*(4 calories per gram of protein) = 48 calories
% Calories from Protein: [(48 calories)/(100 calories)]*100 = 48 %
48 % of the calories come from protein



Thanks for writing.


Staff
www.solving-math-problems.com



Apr 16, 2011
Calculate Calories from Fat
by: Staff


Part I

The question:

Gather three of your favorite packaged foods; perhaps one from each: breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Use the model explained in the “Are You Sure It’s Fat Free?” to analyze, through the mathematical formula explained, the fat content and protein content from your foods.

To analyze the protein content use 4 calories per gram of protein, rather than the 9 calories for grams of fat.

The answer:

-----------------------------------------
Summary of Article: “Are You Sure It’s Fat Free?”
The reason that a 97% fat free food is too good to be true is that the food industry bases its figures on the weight of the product and not the calories the product contains. For example, suppose a 10 ounce serving of food contains 240 calories, and the label states that it contains 9 grams of fat. the food industry then converts 10 ounces to grams by multiplying each ounce by 29 grams; hence, the total weight of the product is 290 grams, and if there are 9 grams of fat, the percentage of fat is 9/290x100%=3.1%
The procedure used by the food industry is misleading. The correct way to calculate the fat content is to multiply the number of grams of fat by 9 to get the calories. (Each gram of fat is converted to 9 calories) In this case, 9x9=81 calories. Next, divide the fat calories by the total calories and multiply by 100% to get the percentage of calories derived from fat. In this case the label stated that a 10 ounce serving contains a total of 240 calories.
81/240x100%=33.75%
Hence, 33.75% of the calories come from fat, not 3% as suggested.
-----------------------------------------


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