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how would exponents be used in a math (runs per game )

by Dan ONeill
(Boston, MA. USA)











































how is this solved ??

(5^1.95)/(5^1.95)+ (3^1.95)= % ??


also:
(5^1.805)/ (5^1.805) + (3^1.805)= % ??

Could you please explain how each is solved

Comments for how would exponents be used in a math (runs per game )

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Aug 25, 2011
Exponents and Runs per Game
by: Staff


The question:

by Dan ONeill
(Boston, MA. USA)

(5^1.95)/(5^1.95)+ (3^1.95)= % ??


also:

(5^1.805)/ (5^1.805) + (3^1.805)= % ??

Could you please explain how each is solved



The answer:

I’m unclear if you meant what you wrote, or if you actually meant this:

The Pythagorean expectation: (used to estimate the proportion of how many games a baseball team should win):

Win ≈ (runs scored)²/[(runs scored)² + (runs allowed)²]


The calculations you asked for help on are:

a. (5^1.95)/(5^1.95)+ (3^1.95)= % ??


(5^1.95)/(5^1.95)+ (3^1.95)

= 1+ (3^1.95)

= 1 + 8.51896

= 9.51896 (this is not a percent)


b. (5^1.805)/ (5^1.805) + (3^1.805)= = % ??

(5^1.805)/ (5^1.805) + (3^1.805)

= 1+ (3^1.805)

= 1+ 7.26447

= 8.26447 (this is not a percent)



The calculations for the Pythagorean expectation are:


a1. (5^1.95)/[(5^1.95)+ (3^1.95)]= % ??

(5^1.95)/[(5^1.95)+ (3^1.95)]

= 23.067/(23.067 + 8.51896)

= 23.067/(31.586)

= 0.730292

= 73.0292%



b1. (5^1.805)/ (5^1.805) + (3^1.805) = % ??

(5^1.805)/ [(5^1.805) + (3^1.805)]

= 18.2659/(18.2659 + 7.26447)

= 18.2659/(25.5304)

= 0.715457

= 71.5457%



Final Note:



Any number can be converted to a %. Simply multiply the number by 100.

A % is used to compare a number (any number) to 100 using division.

For example, the number 8.26447 in (part b of your question) can be converted to 826.447 percent (because 826.447 ÷ 100 = 8.26447).

However, this is a bit misleading.

A % sign should only used to represent a proportion. A percent tells you that you are dealing with a ratio.



Thanks for writing.

Staff
www.solving-math-problems.com



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