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Interval Notation & Graph - Algebra










































• Describe what the graph of interval -4, 10 looks like. Describe the graph of (3, 7]. Make sure you are referring to a number line in your answer. What do the brackets represent? What does the parenthesis represent? How is this similar to open and closed circles in inequalities?

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Apr 12, 2012
Interval Notation & Graph
by: Staff


Part I

Question:

• Describe what the graph of interval -4, 10 looks like. Describe the graph of (3, 7]. Make sure you are referring to a number line in your answer. What do the brackets represent? What does the parenthesis represent? How is this similar to open and closed circles in inequalities?


Answer:

-4, 10

There are four possibilities.


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Interval

[-4, 10] - means all REAL numbers between -4 and 10

“[” means the end point of -4 is included in the interval. This is shown as a closed circle (solid, filled in circle) on the number line graph.

“]” means the end point of 10 is included in the interval. This is shown as a closed circle (solid, filled in circle) on the number line graph.


Open the following link to view a graph of the interval [-4, 10] on a number line.

(1) If your browser is Firefox, click the following link to VIEW the solution; or if your browser is Chrome, Internet Explorer, Opera, or Safari (2A) highlight and copy the link, then (2B) paste the link into your browser Address bar & press enter:

Use the Backspace key to return to this page

http://www.solving-math-problems.com/images/interval-graph--4-to-10-01-2012-04-11.png


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Interval

(-4, 10) - means all REAL numbers between -4 and 10


“(” means the end point of -4 is NOT included in the interval. This is shown as an open circle on the number line graph.


“)” means the end point of 10 is NOT included in the interval. This is shown as an open circle on the number line graph.



Open the following link to view a graph of the interval (-4, 10) on a number line.


http://www.solving-math-problems.com/images/interval-graph--4-to-10-02-2012-04-11.png


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Apr 12, 2012
Interval Notation & Graph
by: Staff


----------------------------------

Part II




Interval

[-4, 10) - means all REAL numbers between -4 and 10


“[“ means the end point of -4 is included in the interval. This is shown as a closed circle (solid, filled in circle) on the number line graph.


“)” means the end point of 10 is NOT included in the interval. This is shown as an open circle on the number line graph.




Open the following link to view a graph of the interval [-4, 10) on a number line.


http://www.solving-math-problems.com/images/interval-graph--4-to-10-03-2012-04-11.png


----------------------------------


Interval

(-4, 10] - means all REAL numbers between -4 and 10

“(” means the end point of -4 is NOT included in the interval. This is shown as an open circle on the number line graph.


“]” means the end point of 10 is included in the interval. This is shown as a closed circle (solid, filled in circle) on the number line graph.



Open the following link to view a graph of the interval (-4, 10] on a number line.


http://www.solving-math-problems.com/images/interval-graph--4-to-10-04-2012-04-11.png


----------------------------------


Interval

(3, 7] - means all REAL numbers between 3 and 7

“(” means the end point of 3 is NOT included in the interval. This is shown as an open circle on the number line graph.


“]” means the end point of 7 is included in the interval. This is shown as a closed circle (solid, filled in circle) on the number line graph.


Open the following link to view a graph of the interval (3, 7] on a number line.


http://www.solving-math-problems.com/images/interval-graph-3-to-7-01-2012-04-11.png






Thanks for writing.

Staff
www.solving-math-problems.com



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