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Mean, Median, and Mode - Math 126

by Robert
(Kona, Hawaii)










































Select a topic of interest to you and record the topic in your posting, for how many people that returned to college after age of 30?” Make sure the question you ask will be answered with a number, rather than answers with words.
Write a hypothesis of what you expect your research to reveal. Example: Adults 21 years and over watch an average of 2.5 hours of TV per day.
Sample at least fifteen people and record their data in a simple table or chart; study the examples from Section 12-3.
You can gather your data at work, on the phone, or via some other method. This is your “Sampling Design.” Which of the four sampling techniques best describes your design?
Explain in moderate detail the method you used to gather your data. In statistics this venture is called the “Methodology.”
Make sure you break your sample into classes or groups, such as males/females, or ages, or time of day, etc.
Calculate the mean, median, and mode for your data as a whole.
Now calculate the mean, median, and mode of each of your classes or groups.
Indicate which measure of central tendency best describes your data and why. Then compare your results for each class or group, and point out any interesting results or unusual outcomes between the classes or groups. This is called a “comparative analysis” – using our results to explain interesting outcomes or differences (i.e., between men and women).
Comment on at least two of your classmates’ postings. Make sure you comment on their hypothesis (topic), their design, and whether you agree or do not agree with their best measure of central tendency

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Apr 20, 2012
Mean, Median, and Mode - Math 126
by: Staff



Question:

by Robert
(Kona, Hawaii)


Select a topic of interest to you and record the topic in your posting, for how many people that returned to college after age of 30?”

Make sure the question you ask will be answered with a number, rather than answers with words.

Write a hypothesis of what you expect your research to reveal. Example: Adults 21 years and over watch an average of 2.5 hours of TV per day.

Sample at least fifteen people and record their data in a simple table or chart; study the examples from Section 12-3.

You can gather your data at work, on the phone, or via some other method. This is your “Sampling Design.” Which of the four sampling techniques best describes your design?

Explain in moderate detail the method you used to gather your data. In statistics this venture is called the “Methodology.”

Make sure you break your sample into classes or groups, such as males/females, or ages, or time of day, etc.

Calculate the mean, median, and mode for your data as a whole.

Now calculate the mean, median, and mode of each of your classes or groups.

Indicate which measure of central tendency best describes your data and why.

Then compare your results for each class or group, and point out any interesting results or unusual outcomes between the classes or groups.

This is called a “comparative analysis” – using our results to explain interesting outcomes or differences (i.e., between men and women).

Comment on at least two of your classmates’ postings. Make sure you comment on their hypothesis (topic), their design, and whether you agree or do not agree with their best measure of central tendency



Answer:


You didn’t include any survey results for how many people that returned to college after age of 30.

Without that information I can’t complete any calculations.

However, I have found a good example in our archives.

Even though the question answered in the example is not the same as yours, the procedure for completing the calculations is the same. All you need to do is replace the numbers in the example with numbers you gather in your survey.


Open the following link to VIEW the example.


(1) If your browser is Firefox, click the following link to VIEW the example; or if your browser is Chrome, Internet Explorer, Opera, or Safari (2A) highlight and copy the link, then (2B) paste the link into your browser Address bar & press enter:

Use the Backspace key to return to this page

http://www.solving-math-problems.com/math-statistics-methodology.html



Thanks for writing.

Staff
www.solving-math-problems.com



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